Marathon Thoughts.

This morning’s run was delightful. I was wearing my magic Newton’s, floating along, no music, just me and the pavement.
There were a couple of people out and about, so I said “Good Morning” to them. Felt the crispness of the breeze on my face. Just kept telling myself to put one foot in front of the other. Thought at first I could only muster 6 miles. But no, you can go further, said self. You can push farther, go faster. You don’t need music. Keep going. It’s still early. The sun’s coming out.
Do you talk to yourself during runs? I definitely do. I think it may stem from me being an only child and really talking to myself about everything and always being in my own head all the time. But I have this coach inside of my head. This relentless coach that never lets me give up. That wants to fight all the time. I think it’s so important to have that mental game, especially in the marathon. I am a firm believer in the fact that your mental game can make or break a race. It’s those things that you say to yourself that will push you even closer to the finish.
During a marathon, I go through various phases. In the beginning, it’s all positive. The crowd support pumps you up, makes you feel like you are about to conquer the world. The gun goes off, you cross the start line and turn your watch on, and you just feel alive. Then as the miles go by and the crowd support dies down a little you are left to your own thoughts. It’s just you and nature. Where does your mind go at that point? Does it go south? I think that this is the moment where it counts. You really do have to turn those voices off. I read something the other day from blogger Craig Miller that really rang true to me.
Interview w/ triathlete Mark Allen from Inside Triathlon, Nov ’11
I think when you enter a state of calm and just turn all of the noise in your head off is when you can really do some of your best work. This morning during my 7 mile run, I did that. I just kept putting one foot in front of the other, turned off the voices in my head of being tired, achy legs, whatever. I just kept pushing. No music, no motivation needed. All I needed to do was run. And It felt good all the way to the end.  I stopped at 7 miles, took a walk to cool down, said a prayer, went inside and got ready for work. Great morning.
I thought this was funny someone posted recently about thoughts during a marathon. Some of it is really true to form.
What are some of your thoughts during a race or marathon? Do you have a mantra you like to have with you? 
Mine is Philippians 4:13. “I can do all things through Christ who strengthens me.”